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This conference will feature concurrent workshops led by faculty, staff, students, and/or community organization representatives.

Conference Goals:

  • Provide opportunities for stakeholders (i.e. students, faculty, staff, and community partners) to collaborate, network, and develop their capacity to lead transformative service experiences.
  • Strengthen the capacity of Maryland and Washington, D.C. campuses to create and sustain university-community partnerships
  • Celebrate the latest thinking about how colleagues and universities interpret and advance their civic missions.

Morning Sessions

11:30am-12:45pm

Session


Gender Studies Class as a Site for Citizenship Behavior Room 305

Roosevelt Institute Policy Change Room 306

Engaging Students as Active Citizens in our Democracy Room 307

Serve, Serve, Serve: A Journey Towards a Lifetime of Service Room 308

Fostering Leadership and Advocacy Among Future Health, Law and Social Service Professionals: A Baltimore Model Chesapeake I

Making Meaning Through Service Chesapeake II

HBCU Faculty-Led International Service Learning Lessons: Plugged Into Social Media Chesapeake III

Intercultural Competency and Community Service Learning Room 314

 

Afternoon Sessions

1:45pm - 3:00pm

Session


Teaching and Learning About Communities Room 305

The Community Love Playbook: A How-To Guide for Community Building in Difficult Political Room 306

The Big Event at Towson University Room 307

Educating for Active Citizenship: Developing an Action Plan for Increasing Democratic Engagement Room Room 308

SOURCE Social Justice Task Force: A Framework for Developing Critical-Consciousness Practice Chesapeake I

The Why and How of Institutionalizing Voter Registration on Campus Chesapeake II

John Dewey and the Philosophical Foundations of Civic Engagement Chesapeake III

 

Morning Sessions

 

Gender Studies Class as a Site for Citizenship Behavior

  • Sharyn Lowenstein

This workshop focuses on ways to democratize the classroom through a variety of pedagogical practices including the framing of the syllabus and crafting of methods to maximize student voice. In this interactive session we will look at democracy as an ideal that requires ongoing doing and working at, and ask questions about the kind of democracy we might want in the classroom and the kind of civic engagement we want our students to develop.

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Roosevelt Institute Policy Change

  • Carl Amritt

This workshop will teach participants how to engage in the democratic process through executing their own policy project. The Roosevelt Institute is home to the nation’s largest student-led think tank, operating on 140+ college campuses across the country.

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Engaging Students as Active Citizens in our Democracy

  • Clarissa Unger
  • Emily Giffin
  • Anjelica Smith

The Students Learn Students Vote (SLSV) Coalition was formed by nonpartisan organizations across the country to increase student voter engagement through data-driven approaches. In 2016, our 90 Coalition Partners worked with over 168 campuses to implement the SLSV Checklist, a guide that provides a measurable and manageable experience for institutions to lead, assess, engage, and plan how to make democratic engagement central to the student experience by involving the entire university. This session will present lessons learned from 2016, give participants a chance to evaluate existing practices and to learn about additional programs and resources available to them.

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Serve, Serve, Serve: A Journey Towards a Lifetime of Service

  • Jacquelyn Thomas

Community service is more than and action it's a way of living in this world. It teaches you the true meaning of selflessness and can have the most heart warming effects on those that are served and those doing service. Learn how your membership in college community and with service organizations can be the spark on your "lit" life long path of service and philanthropy. In this session the presenter will share her story of going from student leader to AmeriCorp Service member to higher education professional and how a year of service changed her professional trajectory.

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Fostering Leadership and Advocacy Among Future Health, Law and Social Service Professionals: A Baltimore Model

  • Rachael Parran
  • Lori Edwards
  • Anita Maynor

UMB fosters leadership and advocacy for social change by preparing students for careers in health, law and human services emphasizing community engagement across the university. In this workshop, attendees will receive and experience tactical strategies for incorporating advocacy, leadership and how to integrate concepts such as racism and privilege into their teaching and community based practice. In addition, attendees will learn how to approach barriers that may arise when doing this work. UMB students will discuss how coursework has led them to become active citizens and leaders in Baltimore and abroad.

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Making Meaning Through Service

  • Maggy Kay

Actions have meaning when there is a relationship between the action and the person or group completing the action. How can one infuse meaning in their actions? How can one turn their passion into meaningful action? This presentation will discuss turning volunteering into a meaningful experience and turning passion into action. Participants will be encouraged to think about their own lives and what is meaningful to them, and what could become meaningful. Tools for reflection in guiding action and debriefing from action will also be shared.

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HBCU Faculty-Led International Service Learning Lessons: Plugged Into Social Media

  • Loretta Mask Campbell
  • Lombuso S. Khoza
  • Michael E. Lane
  • Jahmai Holland
  • Allyson McCullough
  • Vernajh Pinder

Fifteen students from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, a historically, black university (HBCU), participated in a service learning trip to the Dominican Republic during the 2017 Alternative Winter Break (AWB-2017) session. This workshop will (1) reflect on the connection of social media usage to engage local students and the UMES ISL-DR students; (2) show how UMES students and the local community partner students were able to connect regardless of the language barrier. Currently, AWB-2017 students continue to use social media such as Snapchat, Facebook and WhatsApp, to maintain and strengthen peer relationships initiated while simultaneously increasing the cultural development of each student. Workshop attendees will have the opportunity to meet with UMES ISL-DR student participants, view sample social media posts, and letters of gratitude.

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Intercultural Competency and Community Service Learning

  • Terra Gargano

Description: The increasingly interconnected nature of our communities requires that we not only learn how to effectively communicate across difference, but go beyond understanding other cultures and authentically shift our ingrained and often invisible cultured behaviors. This highly interactive workshop will explore the meaning of intercultural competency and the ways our work with community partners is influenced by our ability to exhibit cultural empathy. Through an interactive simulation, a space for sharing and learning from personal stories, and an examination of what we can potentially learn through our cross-cultural encounters, we will generate ways to “be the spark for action.”

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Afternoon Sessions

Teaching and Learning About Communities

  • Katharine Kravetz

Description: This workshop discusses teaching and learning about communities. Participants should come to the workshop with an example of how they enhance (or want to enhance) student understanding of either the problem the service is attempting to address, or the community in which they are conducting service. We’ll discuss their ideas with the goal of identifying different options for addressing a community issue and finding holistic approaches to solving problems and even transforming communities. Participants will learn one or two basic exercises, as well as how to create their own lessons and exercises to teach students about community itself.

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The Community Love Playbook: A How-To Guide for Community Building in Difficult Political Times

  • Jonathan L. Butler

Social movements and healthy dissent are the cornerstone of any vibrant democracy. Throughout history solidarity among marginalized groups has functioned as a catalyst to a wide variety of social movements. In this session, I will deconstruct this phenomenon into four phases. Community building, learning the tools of the movement, tactics for the movement, and the path to pay it forward, through each phase of the workshop participants will gain new forms of knowledge in which to be the spark for action in their respective communities. Put against the backdrop of current shifts in social, cultural, and political landscapes participants will walk away from this presentation with the toolset necessary to facilitate robust environments of democratic engagement.

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The Big Event at Towson University

  • Lauren Andrews

The Big Event at Towson University is the largest student-run service effort to say “thank you” to our neighbors regardless of their financial and health needs. Each year, The Big Event promotes civic and community engagement by connecting over 2,000 students to serve with over 200 service sites within 2 miles the university. In this session, we will describe how we utilize five committees in order to make connections between TU students and the surrounding community to provide insights as to how you can take the next steps at your university to create programming similar to The Big Event at Towson University.

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Educating for Active Citizenship: Developing an Action Plan for Increasing Democratic Engagement

  • Zaneeta Daver
  • Clarissa Unger

In order for a democracy to be successful and thrive, it must be “of the people, by the people, and for the people.” Unfortunately, a disappointing number of young people opt out of participating in the political process. Colleges and universities can work to change this culture and graduate active and informed citizens. In this session, participants will learn about action plans, how to develop them, and what to include in them. Presenters will also share resources and best practices for increasing democratic engagement and student voting rates.

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SOURCE Social Justice Task Force: A Framework for Developing Critical-Consciousness Practice

  • Keilah A. Jacques

The workshop will provide an introduction to collective impact frameworks, principles of human centered design, and illustrate a process currently underway to navigate the development, alignment, sustainability and relevant establishment of critical-consciousness practice through the SOURCE Social Justice Task Force.
Attendees will accomplish the following learning objectives: 1) Gain an understanding of the way collective impact can support a strategic planning process, through process review. 2) Develop an appreciation of end user process development, through example review. 3) Develop an awareness of the framework in action, through unpacking a process currently underway by SOURCE (Student Outreach Resource Center).


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The Why and How of Institutionalizing Voter Registration on Campus

  • Anjelica Smith
  • Emily Giffin

Institutions that take steps to integrate voter registration into in-person and online processes such as orientation and class registration can dedicate time and resources to voter education, civil dialogue, social justice, and other civic learning initiatives. We will discuss the process barriers associated with youth voter registration and turnout, as well as how to use technology and data to increase campus engagement. We’ll hear about two student-led voter engagement initiatives, GU Votes at Georgetown University and TerpsVote at the University of Maryland-College Park. Workshop participants will be encouraged to share their own triumphs, challenges, and goals related to democratic engagement on campus.

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John Dewey and the Philosophical Foundations of Civic Engagement

  • Alan Penczek

The concepts of civic engagement, service-learning, and experiential education enjoy widespread popularity today, but even in this country are over a century old. Many years ago John Dewey argued that the school and the educational process itself need to be understood in terms of social service. In this workshop we will examine Dewey’s ideology, focusing on My Pedagogic Creed of 1897 and The School and Society of 1900, but the workshop will not assume familiarity with these works. Time will be allowed for discussing Dewey’s relevance to the educational landscape of today, as well as on-going challenges to his philosophy.

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