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This conference will feature concurrent workshops led by faculty, staff, students, and/or community organization representatives.

Conference Goals:

  • Provide opportunities for stakeholders (i.e. students, faculty, staff, and community partners) to collaborate, network, and develop their capacity to lead transformative service experiences.
  • Strengthen the capacity of Maryland and Washington, D.C. campuses to create and sustain university-community partnerships
  • Celebrate the latest thinking about how colleagues and universities interpret and advance their civic missions.

Morning Sessions

11:30am-12:45pm

Session


P20 CONNECTS: Engagement Pipeline through College, Career and Civic Readiness

#You’ve Gone Viral: Gaining Funding on Campus via Crowd Sourcing

How to Build a Bridge between University and Community

A creative model for interdisciplinary service-learning

Sustainability and You

Civic Engagement: From Theory to Practice

 

Afternoon Sessions

2:45pm - 4:00pm

Session


Active Bystander Intervention Training

The Towson University & Baltimore County Public School Model United Nations Program

No Student Should Go Hungry: Starting a Campus Pantry

Integrating Trauma-Informed Authentic Service-Learning Experiences into the Undergraduate and Graduate Curriculum

Elements of a Peaceable Classroom in Early Care and Education

Explore DC: Orienting Students towards Civic Action

 

Morning Sessions

 

P20 CONNECTS: Engagement Pipeline through College, Career and Civic Readiness

P20 CONNECTS is a collective impact initiative to strengthen the pipeline for college, career, and civic readiness throughout the Maryland, DC, and Delaware region by using civic/community engagement. The aim of this initiative is to help create engaged and involved citizens through the combined efforts of K12 and higher education. This workshop will explain how your institution can adapt current programs to become involved with this initiative. To include, detailed explanation of P20 CONNECTS, ideas on how to implement, discussion on how to identify existing P20 CONNECTS programs, and more!

Presenter:

Eleanor Blaser is a recent graduate of Hood College, where she earned her bachelor’s degree in Communication Arts and minored in Literature. Born in Frederick, MD, Eleanor grew up near the Annapolis area before moving back to Frederick to attend college. While at Hood, she succeeded academically and made her mark on the campus by writing for the Hood newspaper and participating in several organizations, including Student Government Association, Campus Activities Board, and the Honors Program. Her interests include literature, pop culture, and social justice.


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#You’ve Gone Viral: Gaining Funding on Campus via Crowd Sourcing

Social media is one of the most efficient and interactive ways of communicating with your campus community, these campaigns can be both effective and entertaining. This past fall the University of Baltimore Campus Pantry designed a social media campaign to help raise awareness for the pantry as well as raise $1,000 dollars to help keep the pantry stocked. This session reviews not only the logistics behind using crowd sourcing, but also how to ensure your campaign gains an audience and interaction. Join us and stay as cool as Kermit the Frog sipping on Lipton tea while we discuss the effectiveness of hashtags, popular culture, target marketing, engaging early adopters, as well as the assessment tools offered on prominent social media platforms.

Presenters:

Jordan Borkoski is a University of Baltimore alum and is now serving as their CCMA AmeriCorps VISTA for the Campus Pantry. She graduated from UB in May 2017 with a B.A. in Environmental Sustainability and Human Ecology: Environmental Science with a minor in Marketing Communications. While at UB, she cofounded the Urban Farming Association and was involved with many organizations on Campus.

Pavan Murli Purswani is beginning his 8th year working in higher education and currently serves as the Coordinator for Transition Programs at the University of Baltimore. Pavan earned his Bachelors of Science in Education with a minor in history at Bowling Green State University. And went on to receive his Masters of Science in Counseling with a Concentration in College Student Personnel at Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania. During his professional career he has worked in the areas of Residential Life, Residential Education, Community Engagement and Transition Programs including New Student Orientation. His professional areas of interest include academic and student affairs partnerships, social justice, technology and mentorship.

Anthony Butler is the Director of Transitions and Community Engagement at UB. He has more than a decade of experience in the areas of student development, community engagement and developing community partnerships, student leadership and transition programs, and non-profit PR and marketing. In his role as Director of Transitions and Community Engagement, Anthony is responsible for planning University of Baltimore’s new student orientation, commencement exercises, community engagement opportunities, and strengths-based initiatives. He also teaches the senior capstone course in the College of Public Affairs Community Studies and Civic Engagement program. He has a bachelor of arts in English from Salisbury University and a master of arts in Publications Design with a specialization in creative writing and publishing arts from University of Baltimore. In his free time he enjoys writing fiction and poetry.


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How to Build a Bridge between University and Community

Our workshop will outline how education institutions can bridge the gap with their surrounding communities by serving and building relationship. We will engage participants with an informative and interactive workshop providing space for questions and answers.

Presenter:

Mandel Copeland is the Founder and CEO of #50K Souls Inc. He has an undying passion to bring unity and empowerment to our communities locally, nationally and globally by making impactful connections and addressing some basic needs. With his unconventional approach he is able to bridge the gap between church, community and institutions. He currently serves on the YMCA of the Chesapeake Board of Directors, the Wicomico County and City Planning and Zoning Commission, the Wicomico County Board of Education Nomination Commission, the Youth Development Advisory Committee (YDAC) - assisting the mayor and city with youth development and well-being Initiatives and the National Folk Festival Musical Programming Advisory Committee.


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A creative model for interdisciplinary service-learning

Today's scientists and designers each work with colleagues and clients of different fields to come together to solve a common project. Our model for service-learning is to partner two different disciplines, each drawing from their own specialized knowledge, to work together to solve one problem. This workshop will present a unique model for a multidisciplinary service-learning course partnership between a 200-level genetics course, a 300-level communication design course, and our community partner, the Education and Community Involvement Branch of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). Students enrolled in our courses developed professionalism and industry knowledge through community-engaged problem solving to design games that would teach middle school students about CRISPR, a cutting-edge gene editing technique. Student presenters from each discipline will provide a sampling of the completed projects and reflect on the learning that occurred during the semester. Our community partner will provide the value such a partnership has to them. Workshop participants will learn possible assessments which they could implement to measure learning gains in each discipline. Finally, the workshop will provide multiple opportunities for participants to discuss multidisciplinary approaches, community-engaged service-learning projects of interest to them, along with assessment methods that could be utilized for each project.

Presenters:

Meghan Marx is an Assistant Professor at Stevenson University specializing in graphic design, motion graphics, information design and typography. Curiosity and communication are the basis of design. Design bridges the gap between knowing and not knowing, between the seen and unseen. Meghan’s current work reflects on our connection with environment by visualizing human exchange with environment. Her work operates between areas of phenomena and metaphor through intermedia including print, installation, and projection. She received her BFA in graphic design from the University of Wisconsin Eau Claire. After graduation, she moved to NYC where she worked as an art director for network news. In 2008 Meghan relocated to Baltimore where she obtained her MFA in the IMDA program at the University of Maryland Baltimore County.

Rivka Glaseris an Assistant Professor of Biology at Stevenson University in Stevenson, Maryland. She earned her Bachelor’s degree in Biology from Goucher College and her Ph.D. in Human Genetics and Molecular Biology from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. She has been at Stevenson University since 2006, first as an adjunct professor for 7 years, then as a Visiting Assistant Professor for two years, and now as an Assistant Professor. Rivka has been teaching introductory biology, genetics, and molecular biology to majors and non-majors for over ten years. Her research interests include genetics education research, as well as psychosocial ramifications of living with genetic disorders.

Stephen Schlegel is a junior Visual Communication Design student at Stevenson University concentrating in photography, design and minoring in business communication.

Connor Wasilnak is a junior Biology major from Stevenson University.


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Sustainability and You

Sustainability is a versatile concept that can be applied to many different situations and projects. Contrary to general belief, sustainability focuses on more than just “clean energy,” it’s about the wise allocation of scarce resources, bringing about long-term change, making 1+1=3, and much more. This presentation will focus on using such strategies and preexisting resources in your area to implement sustainable results for any project. We’ll be using a real-time case study of a current VISTA project, while also showing how these concepts can be applied to your own projects in life. The three main pillars that we’ll be focusing on are financial, social, and environmental sustainability. Come learn what will arguably be the most influential strategy for our modern “conscious consumer” generation and see how it can be applied to your work and personal life.

Presenter:

Jacob Israel Hannah born and homeschooled in the coal mountains of West Virginia, Jacob is a first-generation graduate with a Bachelor’s degree in Managing for Sustainability from Bucknell University. He is currently serving Garrett College in Maryland where he also earned an Associate’s degree in Business Management. Jacob’s focuses are primarily towards community development, facilitation, and non-profit empowerment that he hopes will one day save his state of West Virginia.


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Civic Engagement: From Theory to Practice

This workshop is offered in support civic engagement initiatives by providing an opportunity to refresh understandings and application of experiential pedagogy, to examine and apply principles of effective practice and to evaluate the qualities and importance of a coherent learning assessment process in support of student experiential learning outcomes. Participants will have an opportunity to collectively reflect on the similarities and differences with service-learning opportunities, to establish their personal narrative for engagement and referencing these concepts review their particular program and its application of recommended practice and of its contribution to their institution’s vision for civic engagement initiatives.

Presenter:

Jim Walters is a professor emeritus at Montgomery College, Maryland and in his tenure incorporated service-learning opportunities into his work which ultimately resulted in the establishment of service-learning offices at each of the three campuses to provide professional development, support and placement for both academic and co-curricular initiatives. A longtime member of The National Society for Experiential Education (NSEE) he has served in a variety of positions including a three year term as president. He currently serves as chair of the curriculum committee for NSEE’s Experiential Education Academy and as a national faculty member in that program. Jim currently serves as a director on the board of The Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education and has contributed to the development of Service-Learning and Internship program standards among others. Jim holds degrees from The George Washington University and The Catholic University of America. Currently, he is president of The Walters Group, a consulting and research firm interested in the continued development of effective practice in the field of experiential learning.


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Afternoon Sessions

Active Bystander Intervention Training

Active bystander training teaches effective skills for assessing, de-escalating, and diffusing a problematic situation (physical violence, bullying, hate, xenophobia, etc.). This workshop focuses on a bystander observing a problematic situation and determining if and how to intervene. Distinct from self-assertion training, which teaches how to de-escalate and diffuse unwanted attention when someone is being attacked, this workshop addresses how a witness can take steps to speak up or step in to keep a situation from escalating or to disrupt a problematic situation. It is designed for those that may have little to none prior training. Participants are engaged through various role plays that address conflict situations of their daily lives. Commit yourself to creating communities that that foster peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all. Come learn how you can help eradicate racism in all of its forms, including Islamophobia and xenophobia that has become rampant in our country by becoming an active bystander.

Presenter:

Eliane Lakam - Enthusiastic and empathetic in spirit, Eliane is a well-rounded community organizer and trainer who believes in the power of education in peacebuilding and reconciliation processes. She is passionate about helping people move from conflict to love and compassion. Eliane is actively involved in co-creating communities that embody values such as unity, tolerance, forgiveness, compassion for one’s self and others, and sustainability. She constantly travels across communities to provide mediation and peace education. Eliane has offered nonviolent conflict intervention trainings to teens, parents, teachers, college students and faculty, elected officials, community groups, and other trainers. Her trainings offer ways to cultivate daily practices for living a nonviolent life and making the world a better place. Eliane was named a Newman Civic Fellow by Campus Compact for engaging diverse communities and for her investment in finding solutions for challenges facing communities throughout the country.

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The Towson University & Baltimore County Public School Model United Nations Program

Paul Schuler
Dr. Aslison McCartney
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No Student Should Go Hungry: Starting a Campus Pantry

In recent years, student hunger has made itself known as an issue effecting student success and student retention. The Campus Pantry at the University of Baltimore opened in October 2016 and since its opening, has distributed over 12,000 pounds of food to its students, faculty, staff and alumni. This workshop goes through a step-by step process for starting a food pantry on your campus to include research, determining where and what the pantry will look like, determining the need on campus, fund raising and much more. Participants will have the opportunity to start brainstorming ideas about starting a Campus Pantry when they return to their institutions and to ask questions about the process.

Presenters:

Jordan Borkoski is a University of Baltimore alum and is now serving as their CCMA AmeriCorps VISTA for the Campus Pantry. She graduated from UB in May 2017 with a B.A. in Environmental Sustainability and Human Ecology: Environmental Science with a minor in Marketing Communications. While at UB, she cofounded the Urban Farming Association and was involved with many organizations on Campus.

Pavan Murli Purswani is beginning his 8th year working in higher education and currently serves as the Coordinator for Transition Programs at the University of Baltimore. Pavan earned his Bachelors of Science in Education with a minor in history at Bowling Green State University. And went on to receive his Masters of Science in Counseling with a Concentration in College Student Personnel at Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania. During his professional career he has worked in the areas of Residential Life, Residential Education, Community Engagement and Transition Programs including New Student Orientation. His professional areas of interest include academic and student affairs partnerships, social justice, technology and mentorship.

Anthony Butler is the Director of Transitions and Community Engagement at UB. He has more than a decade of experience in the areas of student development, community engagement and developing community partnerships, student leadership and transition programs, and non-profit PR and marketing. In his role as Director of Transitions and Community Engagement, Anthony is responsible for planning University of Baltimore’s new student orientation, commencement exercises, community engagement opportunities, and strengths-based initiatives. He also teaches the senior capstone course in the College of Public Affairs Community Studies and Civic Engagement program. He has a bachelor of arts in English from Salisbury University and a master of arts in Publications Design with a specialization in creative writing and publishing arts from University of Baltimore. In his free time he enjoys writing fiction and poetry.


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Integrating Trauma-Informed Authentic Service-Learning Experiences into the Undergraduate and Graduate Curriculum

This workshop will discuss what service-learning is and how to incorporate the 4 different types using trauma-informed educational practices in face to face, hybrid, and online formats using backwards design. We will also discuss challenges and benefits of engaging students and community partners in service-learning projects over long (e.g., semester or more) vs. short (e.g., 7 week) periods of time. Attention will be paid to authentic assessments including both formative and summative evaluations of service-learning experiences from the perspectives of learner, educator, and community partner. Participants will have opportunities to share ideas for creating thoughtful, authentic trauma-informed service-learning projects and asked to reflect on questions such as "What do you want your students to know/think/feel/do?" "How can you link content in your courses with real world experiences?" "How will you know if your students have achieved your objectives?" and “How can you incorporate trauma-informed educational practices into the service-learning experience?” Participants will also be encouraged to reflect on how to design and embed assessments in their courses at multiple points for multiple audiences.

Presenter:

Debra L. Berke, CFLE, is a graduate of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (BA in Sociology, MS in Human Development and Family Studies) and the University of Delaware (Ph.D. in Family Studies). Prior to joining Wilmington University faculty in 2007 she taught family studies and women’s studies at Messiah College for 15 years. She has embedded numerous types of service-learning projects in her courses over the years and has done many presentations on the topic at national/international conferences. Dr. Berke is the Director of Psychology Programs.


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Elements of a Peaceable Classroom in Early Care and Education

In this workshop, we will discuss a service-learning project between the University and the Impact Child development Center. Ms. Merryweather, a student in the child development program, is bring her expertise to address genuine community needs. In this instance, “children often arrive at their first educational experiences ill-equipped to deal with the day to day demands and skills needed to be part of a peaceful classroom. As John Lochman (2004) stated in regard to contextual risk factors related to the behavioral and emotional development of children, “Attention begins with the children’s immediate social environment involving their parents and peers. These early and ongoing experiences with parents and peers form children’s developing social-cognitive processes and influences how the children acquire enduring patterns of perceiving others and thinking about how to respond to social problems (p.320). There is a significant need for children to develop the social and emotional skills necessary to interact positively in group settings because of today’s often violent and divisive social climate. According to Carlsson-Paige and Levin (1992), “Children extrapolate from their experiences to build ideas about how the world works, their role in society, how people treat each other and how one can participate effectively”. In addition to the needs of the children, parents are often not prepared to handle the challenge of modeling the peaceable interactions their children need to navigate social environments. Early childhood teachers, and families need concrete strategies and skills to model peaceable behaviors for the children in their care. This study will show the ability of preschool children to effectively deal with discourse and acquire the coping skills needed to peacefully coexist with others by interacting with elements in nature modeled by both teachers and parents alike”. (Merryweather, 2018, unpublished paper)

Presenters:

Donna Satterlee, EdD is a professor at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and teaches eleven different Child Development courses. She recently presented on teaching Math in early childhood at a local county conference. She has been active with the public policy group for the last several years. Her doctorate is in Educational Leadership and Change, a bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood Education and Elementary education, and a master’s in special education. She has been a member of P.E.A.C.E. - PEACE Educators Allied for Children Everywhere, for quite a few years. In addition to her job with the University, she has extensive experience working with children, teachers and programs for children, including Project Head Start and Even Start.

Rose Merryweather has been a director of a child care center for the last 5 years. She has worked in child care for 20 years, implementing many peace building activities.


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Explore DC: Orienting Students towards Civic Action

Many universities and campuses across the nation are in quest to keep students civically engaged while reaffirming their democratic values in this current political climate. Extended orientation programs are often used as a method to facilitate student’s socialization into campus culture through activities that foster acquisition and knowledge of campus values and traditions. Explore DC through Social Justice is a Welcome Week Program at American University focused on creating Civic Ethos, Action and Agency by learning about Washington, DC through five distinct social justice themes. They are Housing & Homelessness, Community Health, Immigration & Refugee Issues, Environment & Sustainability, and Youth Programs & Education. O’Leary (2014) found that freshman students are more likely to believe that they can influence change if they are involved in civic activities through community service. Explore DC focuses on providing incoming students an opportunity to learn about DC, the social justice issues most salient in the city, an opportunity to meet with community partners, connect with one another, and explore the city, while serving in the community and learning about the rich histories of DC’s neighborhoods. The program is peer-led; research says that students’ peers have a greater influence on them than adults do. The program spans three days, one that focuses on community service and one in exploration of the city. Explore DC affirms democratic values such as social and political equality and provides a space for students to engage in healthy dialogue with the at-large community. These values serve as key to a thriving democracy. The goals of this workshop is to share this initiative and evaluation data of the program. The program is American University’s attempt to put ideas into action and orient students to our civic values. During the presentation, I will explain the history behind the program and where we expect to go. I will engage the audience through a variety of questions to help them begin to think about how to plan an extended orientation program that incorporates civic values held by their own university.

Presenter:

Harry Gilliard

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